Macro Photo Monday: Sulphur Flower from Silver City

Sulphur Flower Macro Photo

Canon G12 with Raynox macro lens. ISO 80, f/4.0, 18 mm focal length, 1/640 sec shutter speed.

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday! There’s a lot of backstory first, but it’s interesting, and we’ll eventually get to the macro photos. I promise!

Silver City Macro Photos

Bubbles and M-bug at the Silver City welcome sign.

In early August, my mother-in-law brought our girls back from visiting her for a few weeks. She was going to be with us for three days, and she wanted to do something that we’d never done before when she’s visited. We decided to make a day trip to Silver City, Idaho.

Silver City is essentially a ghost town. It was founded in 1864, and was, as its name suggests, a silver and gold mining town. It was once considered one of the largest cities in Idaho Territory, but once the mines were depleted it began a slow decline. It’s rather difficult to get to, and it just didn’t make sense for regular commerce to set up shop there.

Silver City Church Macro Photo

Bubbles and M-bug at the Our Lady of Tears Catholic church, high on a hill in Silver City, Idaho.

Today, Silver City still has some of the original buildings, many owned by descendants of the town’s original citizens. There are a few small businesses open, and you can stay at the old hotel. Don’t expect any french fries with your hamburger at the hotel restaurant, however, because the hotel runs on solar power, and it just can’t generate enough heat for deep fat fryers.

You can visit Silver City in the summer, but the road is essentially impassible from late fall through spring. The citizens pay for one watchman to stay in the city during the winter to try to discourage any adventurous (and crazy) looters, but otherwise during the winter it’s a complete ghost town.

Silver City Church 2005 Macro Photo

M-bug in front of the Our Lady of Tears Catholic Church in August, 2005.

I’d been to Silver City once before in 2005, with my sister-in-law, Auntie H. She was doing a college history project on ghost towns and had already visited several. One day while Bubbles was at school, Auntie H., M-bug and I got into Auntie H.’s red Ford Mustang, and set off down the highway. It’s truly not far from where we live, but the road there is treacherous, even in good weather. I still can’t believe we made the trip in a Mustang. There’s a steep hill right at the town entrance, and we almost didn’t make it over. And don’t even ask about the cow in the road! It was pretty funny (and a little embarrassing) to see her Mustang parked next to all these huge 3/4 ton pickup trucks with huge tires in front of the hotel. I can’t imagine what the locals thought.

About the Macro Photos

This trip we went into one of the many cemeteries in Silver City, and that’s where I got the majority of my wildflower pictures. Here are two macro photos (one at the top of the post, and one below) of Erigonum umbellatum, or Sulphur Flower. It’s a type of wild buckwheat that’s related to one that I took a picture of near Sandpoint. As always, don’t take my plant classifications as 100% guaranteed, because I’m not a botanist.

I love the tiny little blossoms. These were almost lemon yellow, while some of the others I saw had more of a canary hue. Here’s a picture of a plant whose blossoms were beginning to die.

Sulphur Flower Macro Photo Silver City

Canon G12 with Raynox macro lens. ISO 80, f/4.0, 18 mm focal length, 1/640 sec shutter speed.

I really like how the blossoms all wilt into a pattern. Pretty, as far as a dying flower goes. I’ll have more macro photos from Silver City next time!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Mystery Wildflower from Schweitzer Mountain

Macro Photo Mystery Wildflower

Mystery Wildflower on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. ISO 80, f/4.0, 6mm focal length, shutter speed 1/250 sec.

 

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday!

Ever since Decoder Man and I took our wedding anniversary trip to Sandpoint, Idaho, in July, I’ve been sharing the macro photos I took on the Schweitzer Mountain Nature Hike. Click on the Schweitzer Mountain tag at the bottom of this post to make sure you didn’t miss any!

This macro photo is the last from the set I took that day, and the most perplexing because I absolutely cannot identify it. I guess it’s kind of understandable, because it’s a fairly non-descript white flower. It’s dainty and delicate looking, and since I’m the one who took the photo, it has the obligatory bug in the center of the largest blossom. I looked at Phlox, Springbeauty (Claytonia), Collomia (Mountain Trumpet) and several members of the Mustard family (Brassicaceae), but still no luck. If any of you can help classify it for me, I’d be overjoyed. Or at least really happy.

As always, I used my Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.

It really is a quite pretty little flower, especially when you look at the overall composition with the new buds. I wish I’d taken another picture of it from a different angle, though, with some leaves. Maybe then I could have figured it out. Hopefully it won’t be a mystery for too long. Hope you enjoy it!

Next week I’ll start posting some pictures from our day trip to Silver City, Idaho, in August, so be sure to check back.

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Antennaria rosea

Macro Photo Rosy Pussytoes Antennaria rosea

Rosy Pussytoes, or Antennaria rosea, on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. ISO 80, f/4.0, 6mm focal length, shutter speed 1/500 sec.

 

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday!

During our hike down the Schweitzer Mountain Nature Trail, I took a macro photo of this wildflower, having no idea if it was even considered a wildflower or a weed. I thought it looked interesting, but didn’t really expect to be able to classify it. So when I stumbled across these pictures of Antennaria rosea, or Rosy Pussytoes, I was very surprised. It made me wish I’d tried harder to find a specimen completely in the sunlight.

(Standard disclaimer: I’m an amateur wildflower photographer, not a botanist. None of my plant classifications are 100% guaranteed.)

As always, I used my Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.

Supposedly the plant, an herb, gets its name because the white flower heads look like the pads on a cat’s paw. I’m not sure I see the resemblance from this photo, but I have seen others, closer to when it goes to seed, that do remind me more of cats’ paws. Hope you enjoy it!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Arnica

Macro Photo Arnica

Arnica, either latifolia or cordifolia, or a cross of the two, on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. For some reason my camera didn’t capture the settings for this photo. Guess it was taking a break.

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday!

I had a heck of a time trying to classify this next wildflower, whose picture I took on Schweitzer Mountain near Sandpoint, Idaho, in July. At first I thought it was a wild variety of Coreopsis, or tickseed, but that didn’t pan out. As far as I can tell, it’s either Arnica latifolia or Arnica cordifolia, or even perhaps A. latifolia x cordifolia, since the two evidently hybridize in the wild.

I need to remember to start taking pictures of the whole plant, not just macro photos of the blossoms. It would help with the classification process. (Standard disclaimer: I’m an amateur wildflower photographer, not a botanist. None of my plant classifications are 100% guaranteed.)

As always, I used my trusty Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens. I seem to have a harder time getting yellow and white flowers in crisp focus. Anybody know why?

I love the creamy, trumpet shaped flowers in the center of the blossom.  Hope you enjoy it!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Harebell

Macro Photo Harebell Campanula rotundifolia

Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. ISO 80, f/4.0, 6mm focal length, shutter speed 1/500 sec.

 

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday!

This macro photo is of a flower that is probably familiar to most of us: Campanula rotundifolia, also called harebell. Many varieties of Campanulas, or bellflowers, are available commercially. I’m not sure how this particular specimen came by the name harebell (maybe rabbits like it?), but according to Wikipedia, several poems have been written about it. (Standard disclaimer: I’m an amateur wildflower photographer, not a botanist. None of my plant classifications are 100% guaranteed.)

As always, I used my Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.

I like how delicate this little flower is. I also really like the peach colored, corkscrew shaped stamen At least, I think they’re stamen. I can never tell what’s what. Pretty pathetic for a former Master Gardener.

Most of the bellflowers I saw that day had their little heads down, which is quite common for the plant family, because their stems just can’t hold up the blossoms. This was the only flower I found into whose center I could really see. Hope you enjoy it!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Carolina Bugbane

Macro Photo Carolina Bugbane Trautvetteria carolinensis

Carolina Bugbane (Trautvetteria carolinensis) on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. ISO 80, f/4.0, 6mm focal length, shutter speed 1/1250 sec.

 

It’s time for … Macro Photo Monday!

I’ve always been partial to the Carolinas, because my name is Caroline. My mom was born in South Carolina, but my parents tell me that’s not where they got my name. Also, I had at least one relative with the name (Eudocia Caroline, who went by Dodie — not sure why when she had a perfectly wonderful middle name) plus my dad’s middle name is Carroll, but supposedly I’m not named after either of these people, either. I guess it’s going to remain a mystery, unless my mom decides to enlighten us. I’m convinced it was Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” which is one of my favorite songs to this day, but I digress.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this picture I took on the Schweitzer Mountain Nature Trail in July was of Carolina Bugbane (Trautvetteria carolinensis). It’s also called Tassle-rue. (Standard disclaimer: I’m an amateur wildflower photographer, not a botanist. None of my plant classifications are 100% guaranteed.)

As always, I used my Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.

I love the spiky white petals of this flower, as well as the green centers. My macro photos wouldn’t be complete without bugs, and this photo has those, too. Note the tiny little red bugs on the top left flower. Hope you enjoy it!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com


 

Macro Photo Monday: Worm Leaf Stonecrop

Macro Photo Worm Leaf Stonecrop Sedum stenopetalum

Worm Leaf Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum) on Schweitzer Mountain, July 2012. ISO 80, f/4.0, 6mm focal length, shutter speed 1/250 sec.

 

Mondays can be so hum-drum, can’t they? Back to work, back to school, back to real life.  That’s why I’ve decided to introduce … Macro Photo Mondays! Every Monday I’ll post a beautiful macro photo of a wildflower (or occasionally some other type of plant) for all of us to look forward to. Be sure to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest to make sure you don’t miss one! You can also subscribe for updates at the top of the purple sidebar to the right.

Today’s macro photo is of what I’m relatively sure is Worm Leaf Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum). But as usual, don’t take my wildflower classifications as 100% guaranteed.

I took this photo in July on the Schweitzer Mountain Nature Trail near Sandpoint, Idaho. See some of the other macro photos I took that day here.

As always, I used my Canon G12 with the Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.

Stonecrops, or Sedums, are succulents, and you can really tell that from this photo. Each part of the plant seems to be holding in water. It has that, well, succulent look to it. I also like the pretty, star-like quality of the flowers themselves. Ten points to whoever can find the bee (or whatever type of pollinator it is). Hope you enjoy it!

Originally posted on www.LifeUnfocused.com